Learning through play. The very best way…

Play-based learning isn't always well-understood.
Let us put your mind at ease.



Learning through play, the very best way!

Play-based learning isn't always well-understood. There can be misconceptions about the educational merit of "play" - and how well it prepares children for starting school.

Let us put your mind at ease.

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"Young children’s play allows them to explore, identify, negotiate, take risks and create meaning. The intellectual and cognitive benefits of playing have been well documented. Children who engage in quality play experiences are more likely to have well-developed memory skills, language development, and are able to regulate their behaviour, leading to enhanced school adjustment and academic learning" (Bodrova & Leong, 2005).

VIEW SOURCE

(Early Childhood Australia)

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"While research on brain development is in its infancy, it is believed that play shapes the structural design of the brain. We know that secure attachments and stimulation are significant aspects of brain development; play provides active exploration that assists in building and strengthening brain pathways. Play creates a brain that has increased ‘flexibility and improved potential for learning later in life'"
(Lester, S. & Russell, S. (2008). p. 9. Play for a change. Play policy and practice: A review of contemporary perspectives. Play England) 

VIEW SOURCE

(Early Childhood Australia)

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"Children are naturally motivated to play. A play-based program builds on this motivation, using play as a context for learning. In this context, children can explore, experiment, discover and solve problems in imaginative and playful ways. A play-based approach involves both child-initiated and teacher-supported learning. The teacher encourages children’s learning and inquiry through interactions that aim to stretch their thinking to higher levels."

VIEW SOURCE

(The Conversation)



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"Young children’s play allows them to explore, identify, negotiate, take risks and create meaning. The intellectual and cognitive benefits of playing have been well documented. Children who engage in quality play experiences are more likely to have well-developed memory skills, language development, and are able to regulate their behaviour, leading to enhanced school adjustment and academic learning" (Bodrova & Leong, 2005).

VIEW QUOTE SOURCE

(Early Childhood Australia)


Image

"While research on brain development is in its infancy, it is believed that play shapes the structural design of the brain. We know that secure attachments and stimulation are significant aspects of brain development; play provides active exploration that assists in building and strengthening brain pathways. Play creates a brain that has increased ‘flexibility and improved potential for learning later in life'"
(Lester, S. & Russell, S. (2008). p. 9. Play for a change. Play policy and practice: A review of contemporary perspectives. Play England) 

VIEW QUOTE SOURCE

(Early Childhood Australia)


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Children are naturally motivated to play. A play-based program builds on this motivation, using play as a context for learning. In this context, children can explore, experiment, discover and solve problems in imaginative and playful ways. A play-based approach involves both child-initiated and teacher-supported learning. The teacher encourages children’s learning and inquiry through interactions that aim to stretch their thinking to higher levels.

VIEW QUOTE SOURCE

(The Conversation)


Want to find out more about play-based learning?


“Children learn as they play.
Most importantly, in play children learn how to learn. ”O. Fred Donaldson
“Children learn as they play. Most importantly, in play children learn how to learn. ”O. Fred Donaldson

2 Caley Road, Padbury 6025 | Phone: (08) 9401 2989 | © Padbury Community Kindy 2018


2 Caley Road, Padbury 6025 | Phone: (08) 9401 2989
© Padbury Community Kindy 2018